I feel like I just bought a new car.  That “I just paid a lot of money for something that I’m going to have to live with for a while, so I hope I made the right decision” kind of feeling.  Only this purchase doesn’t come with that new-car smell (or at least I hope it doesn’t).

I just picked out a wig.  Because in a very short period of time, my hair is going to start falling out in clumps (or so they assure me).  My boss told me to pick something fun, like maybe a pink mohawk.  I don’t think a mohawk is really my style, but I did have pink hair in the tenth grade, so I thought about it.  But in order to not look freakish at Thanksgiving, or on my new driver’s license when I renew it in a few months, I figured I need to have a hairpiece that kinda sorta maybe looks like it could be me in some alternate universe.

Jennifer Green at Hair with Care in Atlanta has helped me realize this goal.  Or I should say is helping me to realize this goal, since buying a wig is quite a process.  Choosing a wig is only the beginning of a long road of customization, fitting, cutting, styling, and possibly coloring that goes on.

Selecting a wig was a lot harder than I thought it would be.  Evidently fine, curly hair is not much in demand in the wig business.  I guess no one wants to pay good money to look like a limp poodle.  But fine, curly hair is what I have, so finding a good match has been difficult.  Add to that equation a small head and face, and you can see that Jennifer has her work cut out for her.

But it hasn’t deterred her.  After my first visit, she tracked down some good candidates.  So today I returned to her shop to try them on for size.  Some were definitely too poofy for my small face.  Some were too dark.  Some were too straight.  Some were too wiggy.  One even looked like a “giraffe” (Jennifer’s words).  But from these, we were able to narrow it down to one that with a bit of customization (the hair needs to be thinned, for starters), should suit me.

I never realized how much work goes into a wig.  Or how many different types there are.  There are synthetic wigs and wigs made from real human hair.  There are some wigs that are sensitive to hot temperatures, so you have to be careful to keep them away from heat; even opening a hot dishwasher while wearing it could fry it.

The best choice for me seemed to be a real human hair wig made with “European” hair.  It feels and looks much more natural than the synthetic ones I tried on the first visit.  The wigs made from human hair are of course more expensive.  Also blonde hair is more expensive than other colors, so my wig is coming with a hefty price tag.

Even though I only plan on wearing my wig on special occasions (and wearing turbans, scarves, and caps on most days), I thought it was worth it to spring for the real hair version.  I think if I had settled for the synthetic one, I would have had regrets.

So now that I’ve selected a wig, the next step is to tailor it to my head.  Jennifer is working on making the cap smaller, and removing some of the hair from it so that my small face isn’t completely overwhelmed.  Then we will likely cut it and style it to suit me even better.  And once my natural hair starts to “release,” as they say, the wig may need to be altered slightly again.

I know that nothing is going to be perfect; after all, my real head of hair isn’t perfect (I think I had a short stint of hair perfection in my twenties), so why should a fake head of hair be any different?  But hopefully it will represent me to the world with enough conviction until my own hair (for better or worse) can reclaim its natural place.